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2021 was a record-breaking year for organ transplants in the US

Last year was a record-breaking year for organ transplants in the United States with more than 41,000 people receiving new organs. “Life has been good. I feel great,” said Curtisha Anderson, of Kansas City, Kansas, who recently received a kidney transplant. “Just feel full of life.”Her new kidney was a chance to continue living a healthy life.”Since the transplant, I feel wonderful. I have not been in the hospital since the transplant. My lupus is in remission, and I feel great,” she said.Anderson was one of the thousands who received a new organ. More than 41,000 Americans received transplanted organs in 2021. That’s the highest number ever recorded in a single year in the United States.”We had about six weeks where we were running at maybe 50%,” said Brian Shepard, CEO of United Network for Organ Sharing.That’s because it all happened during the peak of COVID-19, forcing donations from some European countries to fall off by nearly 90%.”We did a really good job of communicating with each other,” Shepard said.Shepard said they worked the phones, trying to find ways to save lives while the pandemic continued.”‘Can you use a donor if they’ve been to China? What if they’ve been to New York,'” Shepard said.Shepard said the transplant waiting list has gotten smaller, adding that it has been living donor donations, such as from Stephanie Meyer, of Shawnee, who have really helped. “Every 13 minutes someone dies on the transplant list waiting for a kidney,” Meyer said, who climbed Mount Kilimanjaro after donating a kidney.”It certainly means we’re going in the right direction but there are still people waiting and there are not enough organs to go around,” Shepard said.”Organ donation, it saves lives and I’m proof of that,” Anderson said.

Last year was a record-breaking year for organ transplants in the United States with more than 41,000 people receiving new organs.

“Life has been good. I feel great,” said Curtisha Anderson, of Kansas City, Kansas, who recently received a kidney transplant. “Just feel full of life.”

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Her new kidney was a chance to continue living a healthy life.

“Since the transplant, I feel wonderful. I have not been in the hospital since the transplant. My lupus is in remission, and I feel great,” she said.

Anderson was one of the thousands who received a new organ. More than 41,000 Americans received transplanted organs in 2021. That’s the highest number ever recorded in a single year in the United States.

“We had about six weeks where we were running at maybe 50%,” said Brian Shepard, CEO of United Network for Organ Sharing.

That’s because it all happened during the peak of COVID-19, forcing donations from some European countries to fall off by nearly 90%.

“We did a really good job of communicating with each other,” Shepard said.

Shepard said they worked the phones, trying to find ways to save lives while the pandemic continued.

“‘Can you use a donor if they’ve been to China? What if they’ve been to New York,'” Shepard said.

Shepard said the transplant waiting list has gotten smaller, adding that it has been living donor donations, such as from Stephanie Meyer, of Shawnee, who have really helped.

“Every 13 minutes someone dies on the transplant list waiting for a kidney,” Meyer said, who climbed Mount Kilimanjaro after donating a kidney.

“It certainly means we’re going in the right direction but there are still people waiting and there are not enough organs to go around,” Shepard said.

“Organ donation, it saves lives and I’m proof of that,” Anderson said.