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Colin Powell's military career brought him to Fort Leavenworth

Colin Powell’s military career brought him to Fort Leavenworth.The general and former U.S. secretary of state died from complications from COVID-19, his family said on Facebook.There is a bust of Powell on the post. It is not far from the Buffalo Soldier Monument, which is a tribute to Black soldiers of the West.When Powell was on the post as part of the command staff, he would regularly jog by the gravel road named for the 9th Cavalry, one of the Black regiments.”And he wondered, ‘Is this all we have to commemorate Buffalo Soldiers in the Army?’ And I think that was the birth of the dream of creating the Buffalo Soldier Monument here at Fort Leavenworth,” said Jeff Wingo, of Fort Leavenworth.He helped organize and fundraise for the statue. On his post statue, Powell is listed as the “driving force” of the monument.”And my experience with Gen. Powell was flying him either from Leavenworth to Washington or back to Leavenworth,” said pilot Hugh Mills.Mills flew out of the Sherman Army Air Field on the post. He said he remembers a predawn flight when Powell poured a cup of coffee from the plane’s galley.”And he just stuck it around to me and said, ‘Do you want a cup of coffee?’ That’s the only time in a 26-year career a general ever got me a cup of coffee,” Mills said.K-State President Richard Myers was the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff and served under Powell.”This story might not be understood a lot. He was a normal human being; as normal as you can be with all he had accomplished,” Myers said.Powell said his inaccurate claim of weapons of mass destruction in Iraq was a blot on his record. Myers said the CIA gave him that data.”I don’t pin that on him,” Myers said.

Colin Powell’s military career brought him to Fort Leavenworth.

The general and former U.S. secretary of state died from complications from COVID-19, his family said on Facebook.

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There is a bust of Powell on the post. It is not far from the Buffalo Soldier Monument, which is a tribute to Black soldiers of the West.

When Powell was on the post as part of the command staff, he would regularly jog by the gravel road named for the 9th Cavalry, one of the Black regiments.

“And he wondered, ‘Is this all we have to commemorate Buffalo Soldiers in the Army?’ And I think that was the birth of the dream of creating the Buffalo Soldier Monument here at Fort Leavenworth,” said Jeff Wingo, of Fort Leavenworth.

He helped organize and fundraise for the statue. On his post statue, Powell is listed as the “driving force” of the monument.

“And my experience with Gen. Powell was flying him either from Leavenworth to Washington or back to Leavenworth,” said pilot Hugh Mills.

Mills flew out of the Sherman Army Air Field on the post. He said he remembers a predawn flight when Powell poured a cup of coffee from the plane’s galley.

“And he just stuck it around to me and said, ‘Do you want a cup of coffee?’ That’s the only time in a 26-year career a general ever got me a cup of coffee,” Mills said.

K-State President Richard Myers was the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff and served under Powell.

“This story might not be understood a lot. He was a normal human being; as normal as you can be with all he had accomplished,” Myers said.

Powell said his inaccurate claim of weapons of mass destruction in Iraq was a blot on his record. Myers said the CIA gave him that data.

“I don’t pin that on him,” Myers said.