COVID-19 LIVE UPDATES: Missouri reports more than 1K in new cases for 6th straight day

COVID-19 LIVE UPDATES: Missouri reports more than 1K in new cases for 6th straight day
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Here are the latest COVID-19 updates around the Kansas City metro area, and in Kansas and Missouri.What you need to know:The Kansas Department of Health and Environment said Friday the state has 323,385 confirmed cases of COVID-19, and there have been 5,197 deaths since the outbreak started. Overall, the state said 45.1% of the population has been vaccinated with at least one dose and 39.8% have completed vaccination. Kansas only updates its case totals on Monday, Wednesday and Friday. The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services said Sunday there have been 544,725 cases of COVID-19 since the start of the outbreak and 9,474 deaths. Overall, the state said 46% of the population has received at least one dose and 40.1% have completed vaccination.SUNDAY8 a.m. — The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services announced the state’s total of confirmed COVID-19 cases reached 544,725 on Sunday, which is an increase of 1,031 confirmed cases. The state also reported there have been 101,685 possible antigen cases to date, which is an increase of 363.The state reported there have been 8,935 positive cases over the last seven days and an average of 1,276 cases a day.The delta variant of the virus is believed to be responsible for much of the spread in Missouri, especially in the southwestern and northern parts of the state. Officials also cite low vaccination rates, especially in rural areas.That same variant has been found in Kansas City-area wastewater treatment facilities, and 10 Kansas City-area health departments issued a joint public health advisory on COVID-19 Friday, recommending that unvaccinated residents wear face coverings.The state said there have now been 9,474 (+0) deaths since the start of the outbreak.There are 16% of remaining ICU beds available, 25% hospital beds available and 70% of ventilators available, the state said. The state also reported there were 1,440 hospitalizations associated with COVID.The overall seven-day positivity rate for the state increased to 13.7%, according to the MDHSS. That number is the highest since it was at 14.2% on Jan. 11.While that number has climbed more than nine percentage points since June, the number is still down from a high of 23.1% in November.Through July 15, the state said it has administered 5,106,468 vaccine doses, 2,820,518 people have initiated vaccination (or received one dose) and 2,461,184 people have received a second dose. Overall, the state said 46% of the population has received at least one dose and 40.1% have completed vaccination.An estimated 44.1% of Kansas City residents have received at least one dose of the vaccine, while Jackson County is at 42.2%, Clay County is at 35.5%, Cass County is at 35.9% and Platte County is at 30.8%. [ MISSOURI COVID-19 DASHBOARD ]Missouri does not list how many people have recovered from COVID-19.Looking at local numbers, the DHSS reported 41,206 confirmed cases in Kansas City, Missouri, and 33,744 cases in Jackson County. The state also lists 8,820 cases in Clay County, 8,234 in Cass County and 3,475 in Platte County.[ HOW TO GET THE VACCINE, TRACKING NUMBERS IN KANSAS, MISSOURI ]SATURDAY8 a.m. — The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services announced the state’s total of confirmed COVID-19 cases reached 543,694 on Saturday, which is an increase of 2,309 confirmed cases. The state also reported there have been 101,295 possible antigen cases to date.The state reported there have been 8,912 positive cases over the last seven days and an average of 1,273 cases a day. The delta variant of the virus is believed to be responsible for much of the spread in Missouri, especially in the southwestern and northern parts of the state. Officials also cite low vaccination rates, especially in rural areas.That same variant has been found in Kansas City-area wastewater treatment facilities, meaning it’s beginning to take hold in the metro, and hospitals in the metro are close to capacity.The state said there have now been 9,474 (+4) deaths since the start of the outbreak.There are 16% of remaining ICU beds available, 25% hospital beds available and 70% of ventilators available, the state said. The state also reported there were 1,424 hospitalizations associated with COVID, the highest since Feb. 12.The overall seven-day positivity rate for the state increased to 13.6%, according to the MDHSS. That number is the highest since it was at 14.2% on Jan. 11.While that number has climbed more than nine percentage points since June, the number is still down from a high of 23.1% in November.Through July 15, the state said it has administered 5,093,250 vaccine doses, 2,811,562 people have initiated vaccination (or received one dose) and 2,456,311 people have received a second dose. Overall, the state said 45.8% of the population has received at least one dose and 40% have completed vaccination.An estimated 44.1% of Kansas City residents have received at least one dose of the vaccine, while Jackson County is at 42.2%, Clay County is at 35.5%, Cass County is at 35.9% and Platte County is at 30.8%. [ HOW TO GET THE VACCINE, TRACKING NUMBERS IN KANSAS, MISSOURI ]FRIDAY7:25 p.m. — The federal government will shut down Dwight Eisenhower’s presidential library and museum again Monday as the faster-spreading delta variant fuels a growing number of new COVID-19 cases in Kansas. READ MORE.5 p.m. — The Johnson County Department of Health and Environment said it has issued a letter on COVID-19 back-to-school guidance to school district superintendents. County health officials said the primary goal is to keep schools open so that children can learn and benefit from interactions with others. READ MORE.3:30 p.m. — The Kansas Department of Health and Environment reported an increase of 1,121 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in its first update since Wednesday, pushing the statewide total to 323,385 since the outbreak started.KDHE reported one new death, making the total since the start of the outbreak 5,197. The state reported hospitalizations increased by 38 to 11,333 since the start of the outbreak.The state also said it is tracking 113 (+10) cases of the delta variant in Johnson County, 56 (+1) in Wyandotte County, 14 (+3) in Leavenworth County, eight (+1) in Douglas County and three (+0) in Miami County.State health officials are now also tracking MIS-C cases in the state, or Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in children, associated with COVID-19. So far, the state notes 17 cases.The overall monthly positivity is at 7.5% for July 2021 to date. However, that number is down from a high of 16.5% in November.The state also said it has vaccinated 1,315,021 people, 2,391,579 total doses of the vaccine have been administered and 45.1% of the population has been vaccinated with one dose and 39.8% have completed vaccination.[ KANSAS COVID-19 COVID-19 DASHBOARD ]Johnson County is the county with the most confirmed COVID-19 cases since the start of the outbreak with 61,138 cases. Sedgwick County is second with 58,654. Wyandotte County is third with 21,484 cases. Leavenworth County has 7,538 cases, Douglas County reports 9,074 and Miami County has 2,894.Health officials said they’re now monitoring 51 (+6) outbreak clusters, up from 45 earlier this month. A total of 382 cases have been attributed to these clusters with 18 hospitalizations and five deaths.3 p.m. — Ten Kansas City-area health departments issued a joint public health advisory on COVID-19 Friday, recommending that residents wear face coverings. This is only a recommendation and not a mandate. READ MORE12:30 p.m. — The state health department said the Kansas COVID-19 dashboard is experiencing technical difficulties, so updated case numbers are not available yet. The last update from Kansas was on Wednesday when it confirmed 322,264 cases.11:15 a.m. — Missouri Gov. Mike Parson said the state will “probably” provide funding for a site to help handle the overflow of COVID-19 patients in Springfield, where hospitals are struggling to keep up with a surge-driven by the delta variant and vaccination hesitation.The Republican governor suggested that federal stimulus money also could help pay for the alternative care site health leaders in the southwestern Missouri city requested. Parson, who was in Springfield on Thursday for an unrelated bill signing, told the Springfield News-Leader that the state will “for the most part probably” fulfill the request.“We’re in the process of kind of going through that right now to see what we can deliver and what we can’t,” he said. “Those are things we’ve done before, so I think we’ll be able to do (the funding).”The fast-spreading delta variant has led to a surge in hospitalizations throughout southwestern Missouri. Springfield’s hospitals expect to see patient counts within days that will exceed the previous peak in mid-winter. As of Thursday, 230 people with COVID-19 were hospitalized there. Three weeks ago, the daily average patient count was fewer than 120.Katie Towns, the interim director of the Springfield-Greene County Health Department, said the alternative care site would provide transitional care for patients stabilized enough to be released from hospitals. She told The Associated Press that options include places such as dorms and hotels. Such makeshift treatment areas were common in Missouri and throughout the country during the winter.Parson told the News-Leader that some of the cost of setting up the site could be covered by federal stimulus money provided to Springfield and Greene County for pandemic relief.“There’s a lot of federal funding on the local level, so there may be ways we can partner with the counties and the cities and the hospitals, and they’ll be able to do their part, you know, to come in and help with that,” Parson said.The governor also told the newspaper that the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention halted the state’s plan to implement an incentive program to encourage vaccinations. Only 45.8% of Missourians have initiated vaccination, which is 10 percentage points below the national average.“The CDC didn’t accept our plan, which is just totally ridiculous that they would turn us down with Missouri in the situation we’re in right now. So, I think it’s just another obvious problem with the CDC,” Parson said.A spokeswoman for Parson on Friday didn’t immediately respond to a request for additional details about the Missouri plan and why the CDC denied it. The CDC also didn’t immediately respond to an email seeking comment. 9 a.m. — Doctors with the University of Kansas Health System say cases and hospitalizations continue to rise. As of Friday, there are 32 active cases with 12 patients in the ICU, three on a ventilator and 31 of the active cases were not vaccinated.“We are in trouble,” Dr. Steve Stites said Friday morning.8 a.m. — The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services announced the state’s total of confirmed COVID-19 cases reached 541,923 on Friday, which is an increase of 1,734 confirmed cases. The state also reported there have been 100,675 possible antigen cases to date, which is an increase of 603 cases.The state reported there have been 8,708 positive cases over the last seven days and an average of 1,244 cases a day. This is the third time this week that the state has reported more than 1,400 confirmed new cases with the highest total coming on Thursday with 2,300 reported.The delta variant of the virus is believed to be responsible for much of the spread in Missouri, especially in the southwestern and northern parts of the state. Officials also cite low vaccination rates, especially in rural areas.That same variant has been found in Kansas City-area wastewater treatment facilities, meaning it’s beginning to take hold in the metro, and hospitals in the metro are close to capacity.The state said there have now been 9,470 (+7) deaths since the start of the outbreak.There are 17% of remaining ICU beds available, 28% hospital beds available and 72% of ventilators available, the state said. The state also reported there were 1,321 hospitalizations associated with COVID, the highest since Feb. 12.The overall seven-day positivity rate for the state increased to 13.5%, according to the MDHSS. That number is the highest since it was at 14.2% on Jan. 11.While that number has climbed more than nine percentage points since June, the number is still down from a high of 23.1% in November.The state said it has administered 5,093,250 vaccine doses, 2,811,562 people have initiated vaccination (or received one dose) and 2,456,311 people have received a second dose. Overall, the state said 45.8% of the population has received at least one dose and 40% have completed vaccination.An estimated 44% of Kansas City residents have received at least one dose of the vaccine, while Jackson County is at 42.1%, Clay County is at 35.4%, Cass County is at 35.9% and Platte County is at 30.7%.[ MISSOURI COVID-19 DASHBOARD ]Missouri does not list how many people have recovered from COVID-19.Looking at local numbers, the DHSS reported 41,029 confirmed cases in Kansas City, Missouri, and 33,614 cases in Jackson County. The state also lists 8,786 cases in Clay County, 8,201 in Cass County and 3,461 in Platte County.[ HOW TO GET THE VACCINE, TRACKING NUMBERS IN KANSAS, MISSOURI ]THURSDAY5 p.m. — Families in the Hickman Mills and Center school districts are encouraged to set aside some time on Saturday, July 17, to get their children vaccinated and ready to return to school.The Kansas City Health Department’s vaccine team will be at Smith Hale Middle School, 9010-A Old Santa Fe Road, from 9 a.m. until 2 p.m., providing regular vaccinations to children entering kindergarten and older grades, as well as COVID-19 vaccinations for children 12 years and older.2 p.m. — Missouri’s health department on Thursday reported the highest daily count of new COVID-19 cases since the dead of winter, and the association representing the state’s hospital is warning that the health care system is potentially on the brink of a crisis.The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services cited 2,302 newly confirmed cases of the virus, the largest one-day count since mid-January, as the delta variant continues to spread in a state with one of the nation’s lowest vaccination rates. Hospitalizations ticked up statewide by 47 to 1,331, as did the number of patients in intensive care units, rising by 19 to 409.Nearly half of the ICU patients – 196 – are hospitalized in southwestern Missouri. Greene County and Springfield leaders are asking the state to fund an alternative care site since hospitals in Springfield are near capacity.The Missouri Hospital Association, in its weekly COVID-19 update, called the situation in southwestern Missouri “dire” and said signals for the rest of Missouri are “foreboding.” Statewide, hospitalizations are up 112% from late May lows, though still far below the winter peak of nearly 3,000.But at least one hospital, Mercy Springfield, was reporting pandemic high numbers of hospitalizations. Erik Frederick, the hospital’s chief administrative officer, wrote on Twitter Thursday that there had been 16 deaths so far this week. Ashley Kimberling Casad, vice president of clinical services at Cox South Hospital in Springfield, said the hospital was less equipped to handle a surge now. One reason is that it has fewer traveling nurses and is finding it harder to hire them. Also, summer is a busy time for elective surgeries.The hospital association said hospitalizations in southwestern Missouri could exceed winter highs within days.“If the rest of the state follows current trajectories – with delta systematically picking off localized pockets of unvaccinated Missourians – our entire health care system will be very near the brink it flirted with during the winter of 2020-2021,” the update stated.A spokeswoman for Republican Gov. Mike Parson didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment. Parson said last week that hospitals weren’t overwhelmed and that the state was “not in a crisis mode.”Dr. Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health, told McClatchy Newspapers in an interview published Thursday in the Kansas City Star that Missouri is the most worrisome place in the U.S. right now.“This is a variant, this delta variant, that’s highly contagious. And so as it starts to spread, anybody who’s not vaccinated is in a danger zone. … The chances of getting infected in Missouri are getting really high and that means potentially serious illness or even death,” Collins said.12:15 p.m. — The Kansas Department of Health and Environment has amended its travel quarantine list to include the countries of the British Virgin Islands, Cyprus, Fiji, Jersey, The United Kingdom and Tunisia. The countries of Brazil, Costa Rica, French Guiana, Maldives, Oman, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Suriname and Uruguay have been removed. These changes are effective today, July 15.A comprehensive list of those individuals needing to quarantine includes visitors and Kansans who have:Traveled on or after July 15 to British Virgin Islands, Cyprus, Fiji, Jersey, The United Kingdom or Tunisia. Traveled on or after July 1 to Namibia. Traveled on or after June 17 to Kuwait or Mongolia. Traveled on or after June 3 to Traveled on or after May 6 to Seychelles. Traveled on or after April 22 to Argentina. Traveled between July 1 and July 15 to Brazil, Oman or Saint Kitts and Nevis. Traveled between June 3 and July 15 to Suriname. Traveled between May 20 and July 15 to Costa Rica or French Guiana. Traveled between May 6 and July 15 to Maldives. Traveled between April 8 and July 15 to Uruguay. Attendance at any out-of-state mass gatherings of 500 or more where individuals do not socially distance (6 feet) and wear a mask. Been on a cruise ship or river cruise on or after March 15, 2020.The travel quarantine period is seven days with a negative test result or 10 days without testing, with release from quarantine on Day 8 and Day 11, respectively. Further information on quarantine periods can be found on KDHE’s website.10:30 a.m. — KMBC 9’s Micheal Mahoney talked to Dr. Francis Collins, the National Institute of Health Director, about the COVID-19 spike in Missouri.10 a.m. — The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services announced the state’s total of confirmed COVID-19 cases reached 540,189 on Thursday, which is an increase of 2,302 confirmed cases. The state also reported there have been 100,0072 possible antigen cases to date, which is an increase of 2,009 cases.That’s the highest increase in confirmed daily cases since Jan. 14.The state reported there have been 8,375 positive cases over the last seven days and an average of 1,196 cases a day.The delta variant of the virus is believed responsible for much of the spread in Missouri, especially in the southwestern and northern parts of the state. Officials also cite low vaccination rates, especially in rural areas.That same variant has been found in Kansas City-area wastewater treatment facilities, meaning it’s beginning to take hold in the metro, and hospitals in the metro are close to capacity.The state said there have now been 9,463 (+8) deaths since the start of the outbreak.There are 20% of remaining ICU beds available and 71% of ventilators available, the state said.The overall seven-day positivity rate for the state increased to 13.1%, according to the MDHSS. That number is the highest since it was at 12.7% on Jan. 13.While that number has climbed more than nine percentage points since June, the number is still down from a high of 23.1% in November.The state said it has administered 5,081,003 vaccine doses, 2,803,468 people have initiated vaccination (or received one dose) and 2,451,561 people have received a second dose. Overall, the state said 45.7% of the population has received at least one dose and 39.9% have completed vaccination.An estimated 44% of Kansas City residents have received at least one dose of the vaccine, while Jackson County is at 42.1%, Clay County is at 35.4%, Cass County is at 35.9% and Platte County is at 30.7%.[ MISSOURI COVID-19 DASHBOARD ]Missouri does not list how many people have recovered from COVID-19.Looking at local numbers, the DHSS reported 40,924 confirmed cases in Kansas City, Missouri, and 33,530 cases in Jackson County. The state also lists 8,773 cases in Clay County, 8,174 in Cass County and 3,457 in Platte County.9 a.m. — Doctors with the University of Kansas Health System say cases and hospitalizations continue to rise and the situation is “fairly concerning.” As of Thursday, there are 37 active cases with nine patients in the ICU, four on a ventilator and 31 of the active cases were not vaccinated.8:30 a.m. — Political leaders in St. Louis and St. Louis County have stepped up their efforts to get people vaccinated amid growing concern that the delta variant of COVID-19 ravaging some rural areas of Missouri is making its way to the state’s most populated region.St. Louis County Executive Sam Page on Wednesday announced the “Sleeves Up STL” initiative, which seeks to enlist beauty salons and barbershops in the northern part of the county to provide vaccine information to customers and encourage them to get inoculated.Meanwhile, St. Louis’ Board of Aldermen on Tuesday endorsed a plan to offer gift cards as an enticement to get vaccinated.The fast spread of the delta variant has led to a spike in new cases and hospitalizations in parts of northern and southwestern Missouri. Page said St. Louis County officials have “grave concerns about the impact it could have here.”He said salons and barbershops are popular gathering places and that he’s hopeful the outreach in northern St. Louis County, where many Black residents live, will lead to more vaccinations. Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show that Black residents are far less likely to get vaccinated than white residents.In the city of St. Louis, where nearly half of the approximate 300,000 residents are Black, only 40.5% of residents have received at least one vaccine dose. Statewide, 45.5% of residents have received at least an initial shot, which significantly trails the national rate of 55.6%.St. Louis aldermen backed a plan that would offer prepaid debit cards worth up to $100 to people who get shots. The funding will come from nearly $500 million in federal funding the city will get for pandemic relief.The plan also would provide one-time $500 payments to 10,000 residents who have been affected by the pandemic. The funding proposal now goes to the Board of Estimate and Apportionment, which is the city’s fiscal body.Democratic Mayor Tishaura Jones has not said if she will support the aldermanic version of the funding measure.New cases have been surging in southwestern Missouri. The Springfield-Greene County Health Department on Wednesday asked the state to help fund a COVID-19 alternative care site at a yet-to-be determined site. It said 231 patients were being treated for the virus in hospitals in Greene County, including 104 who were receiving critical care and 61 who were on ventilators. The alternative care site would provide staffing for transitional care for COVID-19 patients.State health department data shows that 1,284 people were hospitalized with COVID-19 as of Monday. That’s still well below the nearly 3,000 who were hospitalized during the state’s peak period in December, but it’s double the number from mid-May. The 390 people in intensive care units is three times more than in early April.The state on Wednesday reported 1,460 newly confirmed cases of of COVID-19 and 15 more deaths from the disease, pushing its pandemic totals to 537,887 confirmed cases and 9,455 deaths.8 a.m. — The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services is having technical difficulties with its COVID-19 dashboard, and the state says it will be back up and running by midday Thursday.[ HOW TO GET THE VACCINE, TRACKING NUMBERS IN KANSAS, MISSOURI ]WEDNESDAY1:30 p.m. — The Kansas Department of Health and Environment reported an increase of 1,155 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in its first update since Monday, pushing the statewide total to 322,264 since the outbreak started.KDHE reported eight new deaths, making the total since the start of the outbreak 5,196. The state reported hospitalizations increased by 56 to 11,295 since the start of the outbreak.The state also said it is tracking 103 (+9) cases of the delta variant in Johnson County, 55 (+4) in Wyandotte County, 11 (+1) in Leavenworth County, seven (+1) in Douglas County and three (+1) in Miami County.State health officials are now also tracking MIS-C cases in the state, or Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in children, associated with COVID-19. So far, the state notes 17 cases.The overall monthly positivity is at 7.4% for July 2021 to date. However, that number is down from a high of 16.5% in November.The state also said it has vaccinated 1,310,617 people, 2,383,407 total doses of the vaccine have been administered and 45% of the population has been vaccinated with one dose and 39.6% have completed vaccination.[ KANSAS COVID-19 COVID-19 DASHBOARD ]Johnson County is the county with the most confirmed COVID-19 cases since the start of the outbreak with 60,901 cases. Sedgwick County is second with 58,494. Wyandotte County is third with 21,413 cases. Leavenworth County has 7,497 cases, Douglas County reports 9,049 and Miami County has 2,878.Health officials said they’re now monitoring 51 (+6) outbreak clusters, up from 45 earlier this month. A total of 382 cases have been attributed to these clusters with 18 hospitalizations and five deaths.9:30 a.m. — Local health experts say they’re worried that COVID-19 hotspots are starting to encroach on Kansas City. Doctors with the University of Kansas Health System say the numbers show not enough people are being vaccinated. and the spread of the delta variant now adds another layer of concern.”That continues to be infectious, even in areas where we see a higher vaccination rate like Jackson County or Johnson County,” Dr. Steve Stites said. “And then it starts crowding hospitals, which is where I’m, we’re all a little bit nervous because we don’t want to see what’s happening in Springfield happen in Kansas City.”As pressure on hospitals grows, doctors urge you to get vaccinated– if you haven’t yet – to protect yourself and others from the virus.KU doctors said they are treating 39 total COVID-19 patients, 29 of which are listed as active. Eight of those patients are in the ICU, two are on a ventilator and 10 are in recovery. Of the active patients, doctors said six were vaccinated.8 a.m. — The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services announced the state’s total of confirmed COVID-19 cases reached 537,887 on Wednesday, which is an increase of 1,460 confirmed cases. The state also reported there have been 98,063 possible antigen cases to date, which is an increase of 1,429 cases.The state reported there have been 6,804 positive cases over the last seven days and an average of 972 cases a day.The delta variant of the virus is believed responsible for much of the spread in Missouri, especially in the southwestern and northern parts of the state. Officials also cite low vaccination rates, especially in rural areas.That same variant has been found in Kansas City-area wastewater treatment facilities, meaning it’s beginning to take hold in the metro.The state said there have now been 9,455 (+5) deaths since the start of the outbreak.There are 21% of remaining ICU beds available and 71% of ventilators available, the state said.The overall seven-day positivity rate for the state increased slightly to 12.4%, according to the MDHSS. That number is the highest since it was at 12.7% on Jan. 13.While that number has climbed more than eight percentage points since June, the number is still down from a high of 23.1% in November.The state said it has administered 5,067,685 vaccine doses, 2,795,069 people have initiated vaccination (or received one dose) and 2,445,757 people have received a second dose. Overall, the state said 45.4% of the population has received at least one dose and 39.8% have completed vaccination.An estimated 43.9% of Kansas City residents have received at least one dose of the vaccine, while Jackson County is at 42%, Clay County is at 35.4%, Cass County is at 35.7% and Platte County is at 30.6%.[ MISSOURI COVID-19 DASHBOARD ]Missouri does not list how many people have recovered from COVID-19.Looking at local numbers, the DHSS reported 40,785 confirmed cases in Kansas City, Missouri, and 33,409 cases in Jackson County. The state also lists 8,742 cases in Clay County, 8,133 in Cass County and 3,445 in Platte County.[ HOW TO GET THE VACCINE, TRACKING NUMBERS IN KANSAS, MISSOURI ]TUESDAY5:30 p.m. — Rising COVID-19 rates in other states have prompted Chicago to restart a travel order. The Chicago Department of Public Health announced Tuesday that unvaccinated travelers from Missouri and Arkansas have to either quarantine for 10 days or have a negative COVID-19 test. READ MORE11 a.m. — The city of Springfield, Missouri, announced Monday that it was canceling a major summer festival as COVID-19 surges in the region. The Birthplace of Route 66 Festival, which was scheduled for Aug. 13-14 and typically includes live music and a classic car parade, has been called off for the second year in a row due to COVID-19. In 2019, the last year the festival was held, it drew 65,000 attendees over two days, and it was expected to host 75,000 this year, according to the city. READ MORE8 a.m. — The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services announced the state’s total of confirmed COVID-19 cases reached 536,427 on Tuesday, which is an increase of 1,627 confirmed cases. The state also reported there have been 98,063 possible antigen cases to date, which is an increase of 649 cases.The state reported there have been 6,331 positive cases over the last seven days and an average of 904 cases a day.Missouri continues leads the nation in the most new COVID-19 cases per capita in the last two weeks.The delta variant of the virus is believed responsible for much of the spread in Missouri, especially in the southwestern and northern parts of the state. Officials also cite low vaccination rates, especially in rural areas.That same variant has been found in Kansas City-area wastewater treatment facilities, meaning it’s beginning to take hold in the metro.The state said there have now been 9,440 (+52) deaths since the start of the outbreak. The state reported 47 of the new death reports came from further analysis of death certificates.There are 19% of remaining ICU beds available and 71% of ventilators available, the state said.The overall seven-day positivity rate for the state dropped slightly to 12.2%, according to the MDHSS.While that number has climbed more than eight percentage points since June, the number is still down from a high of 23.1% in November.The state said it has administered 5,056,125 vaccine doses, 2,787,444 people have initiated vaccination (or received one dose) and 2,441,218 people have received a second dose. Overall, the state said 45.4% of the population has received at least one dose and 39.8% have completed vaccination.An estimated 43.8% of Kansas City residents have received at least one dose of the vaccine, while Jackson County is at 41.9%, Clay County is at 35.3%, Cass County is at 35.7% and Platte County is at 30.6%.[ MISSOURI COVID-19 DASHBOARD ]Missouri does not list how many people have recovered from COVID-19.Looking at local numbers, the DHSS reported 40,682 confirmed cases in Kansas City, Missouri, and 33,350 cases in Jackson County. The state also lists 8,728 cases in Clay County, 8,108 in Cass County and 3,436 in Platte County.[ HOW TO GET THE VACCINE, TRACKING NUMBERS IN KANSAS, MISSOURI ]MONDAY3:15 p.m. — Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 vaccine may pose a “small possible risk” of a rare but potentially dangerous neurological reaction, U.S. health officials said Monday.The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said in a statement it has received reports of 100 people who got the shot developing Guillain-Barré syndrome, an immune system disorder that can cause muscle weakness and occasionally paralysis. READ MORE1:30 p.m. — The Kansas Department of Health and Environment reported an increase of 672 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in its first update since last Friday, pushing the statewide total to 321,109 since the outbreak started.KDHE reported 12 new deaths, making the total since the start of the outbreak 5,188. The state reported hospitalizations increased by 22 to 11,239 since the start of the outbreak.The state also said it is tracking 94 cases of the delta variant in Johnson County, 51 in Wyandotte County, 10 in Leavenworth County, six in Douglas County and two in Miami County.State health officials are now also tracking MIS-C cases in the state, or Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in children, associated with COVID-19. So far, the state notes 17 cases.The overall monthly positivity is at 7.1% for July 2021 to date – which is a spike of 4% from the last update. However, that number is down from a high of 16.5% in November.The state also said it has vaccinated 1,307,288 people, 2,376,825 total doses of the vaccine have been administered and 44.9% of the population has been vaccinated with one dose and 39.5% have completed vaccination.[ KANSAS COVID-19 COVID-19 DASHBOARD ]Johnson County is the county with the most confirmed COVID-19 cases since the start of the outbreak with 60,597 cases. Sedgwick County is second with 58,381. Wyandotte County is third with 21,312 cases. Leavenworth County has 7,442 cases, Douglas County reports 9,040 and Miami County has 2,867.Health officials said they’re now monitoring 45 outbreak clusters, up from 26 earlier this month. A total of 298 cases have been attributed to these clusters with 21 hospitalizations and seven deaths.11:30 a.m. — Kansas and Missouri are getting more federal money to fight COVID-19.10:30 a.m. — A Springfield, Missouri hospital on Sunday announced it opened its sixth COVID-19 ward as the delta virus variant rages in the state’s southwest region. That’s the most virus wards Mercy Hospital in Springfield has had. Chief Administrative Officer Erik Frederick tweeted that the hospital needed at most five COVID-19 wards last year. The hospital was treating 133 virus patients as of Sunday. “Many local rural communities don’t have high vaccination rates,” Frederick wrote. “They also don’t have a hospital. Get sick, come to Springfield. I think that’s getting left out of the narrative.”9:15 a.m. — As coronavirus case numbers grow, the University of Kansas system is starting to fill up again.Doctors and nurses are treating 39 patients for COVID-19, and 26 are considered active inpatients, with nine people in the ICU and 10 on ventilators.Doctors say seven of the 39 patients are vaccinated, and two of them are in the ICU. Doctors say they’re working to get more information on their health histories and backgrounds.”Remember, out of 39 people, 32 have not been vaccinated,” Dr. Steve Stites said. “But we just want to make sure that we’ve got all the right advice that we can for folks who are being vaccinated and especially if you have other illnesses that accompany that “Doctors recommend people with underlying health conditions should keep taking safety precautions, even if they’ve been vaccinated.8 a.m. — The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services announced the state’s total of confirmed COVID-19 cases reached 534,800 on Monday, which is an increase of 154 confirmed cases. The state also reported there have been 98,063 possible antigen cases to date, which is an increase of 17 cases.The state reported there have been 5,834 positive cases over the last seven days and an average of 833 cases a day.Missouri continues leads the nation in the most new COVID-19 cases per capita in the last two weeks.The delta variant of the virus is believed responsible for much of the spread in Missouri, especially in the southwestern and northern parts of the state. Officials also cite low vaccination rates, especially in rural areas.That same variant has been found in Kansas City-area wastewater treatment facilities, meaning it’s beginning to take hold in the metro.The state said there have now been 9,388 (+1) deaths since the start of the outbreak. There are 17% of remaining ICU beds available and 71% of ventilators available, the state said.The overall seven-day positivity rate for the state dropped slightly to 12.3%, according to the MDHSS.While that number has climbed more than eight percentage points since June, the number is still down from a high of 23.1% in November.The state said it has administered 5,048,186 vaccine doses, 2,782,295 people have initiated vaccination (or received one dose) and 2,437,868 people have received a second dose. Overall, the state said 45.3% of the population has received at least one dose and 39.7% have completed vaccination.As of Saturday, an estimated 43.7% of Kansas City residents have received at least one dose of the vaccine, while Jackson County is at 41.8%, Clay County is at 35.2%, Cass County is at 35.6% and Platte County is at 30.5%.[ MISSOURI COVID-19 DASHBOARD ]Missouri does not list how many people have recovered from COVID-19.Looking at local numbers, the DHSS reported 40,594 confirmed cases in Kansas City, Missouri, and 33,245 cases in Jackson County. The state also lists 8,712 cases in Clay County, 8,083 in Cass County and 3,424 in Platte County. [ HOW TO GET THE VACCINE, TRACKING NUMBERS IN KANSAS, MISSOURI ]The Associated Press contributed to this story.

Here are the latest COVID-19 updates around the Kansas City metro area, and in Kansas and Missouri.

What you need to know:

  • The Kansas Department of Health and Environment said Friday the state has 323,385 confirmed cases of COVID-19, and there have been 5,197 deaths since the outbreak started. Overall, the state said 45.1% of the population has been vaccinated with at least one dose and 39.8% have completed vaccination. Kansas only updates its case totals on Monday, Wednesday and Friday.
  • The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services said Sunday there have been 544,725 cases of COVID-19 since the start of the outbreak and 9,474 deaths. Overall, the state said 46% of the population has received at least one dose and 40.1% have completed vaccination.

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SUNDAY
8 a.m. — The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services announced the state’s total of confirmed COVID-19 cases reached 544,725 on Sunday, which is an increase of 1,031 confirmed cases. The state also reported there have been 101,685 possible antigen cases to date, which is an increase of 363.

The state reported there have been 8,935 positive cases over the last seven days and an average of 1,276 cases a day.

The delta variant of the virus is believed to be responsible for much of the spread in Missouri, especially in the southwestern and northern parts of the state. Officials also cite low vaccination rates, especially in rural areas.

That same variant has been found in Kansas City-area wastewater treatment facilities, and 10 Kansas City-area health departments issued a joint public health advisory on COVID-19 Friday, recommending that unvaccinated residents wear face coverings.

The state said there have now been 9,474 (+0) deaths since the start of the outbreak.

There are 16% of remaining ICU beds available, 25% hospital beds available and 70% of ventilators available, the state said. The state also reported there were 1,440 hospitalizations associated with COVID.

The overall seven-day positivity rate for the state increased to 13.7%, according to the MDHSS. That number is the highest since it was at 14.2% on Jan. 11.

While that number has climbed more than nine percentage points since June, the number is still down from a high of 23.1% in November.

Through July 15, the state said it has administered 5,106,468 vaccine doses, 2,820,518 people have initiated vaccination (or received one dose) and 2,461,184 people have received a second dose. Overall, the state said 46% of the population has received at least one dose and 40.1% have completed vaccination.

An estimated 44.1% of Kansas City residents have received at least one dose of the vaccine, while Jackson County is at 42.2%, Clay County is at 35.5%, Cass County is at 35.9% and Platte County is at 30.8%.

[ MISSOURI COVID-19 DASHBOARD ]

Missouri does not list how many people have recovered from COVID-19.

Looking at local numbers, the DHSS reported 41,206 confirmed cases in Kansas City, Missouri, and 33,744 cases in Jackson County. The state also lists 8,820 cases in Clay County, 8,234 in Cass County and 3,475 in Platte County.


[ HOW TO GET THE VACCINE, TRACKING NUMBERS IN KANSAS, MISSOURI ]


SATURDAY

8 a.m. — The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services announced the state’s total of confirmed COVID-19 cases reached 543,694 on Saturday, which is an increase of 2,309 confirmed cases. The state also reported there have been 101,295 possible antigen cases to date.

The state reported there have been 8,912 positive cases over the last seven days and an average of 1,273 cases a day.

The delta variant of the virus is believed to be responsible for much of the spread in Missouri, especially in the southwestern and northern parts of the state. Officials also cite low vaccination rates, especially in rural areas.

That same variant has been found in Kansas City-area wastewater treatment facilities, meaning it’s beginning to take hold in the metro, and hospitals in the metro are close to capacity.

The state said there have now been 9,474 (+4) deaths since the start of the outbreak.

There are 16% of remaining ICU beds available, 25% hospital beds available and 70% of ventilators available, the state said. The state also reported there were 1,424 hospitalizations associated with COVID, the highest since Feb. 12.

The overall seven-day positivity rate for the state increased to 13.6%, according to the MDHSS. That number is the highest since it was at 14.2% on Jan. 11.

While that number has climbed more than nine percentage points since June, the number is still down from a high of 23.1% in November.

Through July 15, the state said it has administered 5,093,250 vaccine doses, 2,811,562 people have initiated vaccination (or received one dose) and 2,456,311 people have received a second dose. Overall, the state said 45.8% of the population has received at least one dose and 40% have completed vaccination.

An estimated 44.1% of Kansas City residents have received at least one dose of the vaccine, while Jackson County is at 42.2%, Clay County is at 35.5%, Cass County is at 35.9% and Platte County is at 30.8%.


[ HOW TO GET THE VACCINE, TRACKING NUMBERS IN KANSAS, MISSOURI ]


FRIDAY

7:25 p.m. — The federal government will shut down Dwight Eisenhower’s presidential library and museum again Monday as the faster-spreading delta variant fuels a growing number of new COVID-19 cases in Kansas. READ MORE.

5 p.m. — The Johnson County Department of Health and Environment said it has issued a letter on COVID-19 back-to-school guidance to school district superintendents. County health officials said the primary goal is to keep schools open so that children can learn and benefit from interactions with others. READ MORE.

3:30 p.m. — The Kansas Department of Health and Environment reported an increase of 1,121 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in its first update since Wednesday, pushing the statewide total to 323,385 since the outbreak started.

KDHE reported one new death, making the total since the start of the outbreak 5,197. The state reported hospitalizations increased by 38 to 11,333 since the start of the outbreak.

The state also said it is tracking 113 (+10) cases of the delta variant in Johnson County, 56 (+1) in Wyandotte County, 14 (+3) in Leavenworth County, eight (+1) in Douglas County and three (+0) in Miami County.

State health officials are now also tracking MIS-C cases in the state, or Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in children, associated with COVID-19. So far, the state notes 17 cases.

The overall monthly positivity is at 7.5% for July 2021 to date. However, that number is down from a high of 16.5% in November.

The state also said it has vaccinated 1,315,021 people, 2,391,579 total doses of the vaccine have been administered and 45.1% of the population has been vaccinated with one dose and 39.8% have completed vaccination.

[ KANSAS COVID-19 COVID-19 DASHBOARD ]

Johnson County is the county with the most confirmed COVID-19 cases since the start of the outbreak with 61,138 cases. Sedgwick County is second with 58,654. Wyandotte County is third with 21,484 cases. Leavenworth County has 7,538 cases, Douglas County reports 9,074 and Miami County has 2,894.

Health officials said they’re now monitoring 51 (+6) outbreak clusters, up from 45 earlier this month. A total of 382 cases have been attributed to these clusters with 18 hospitalizations and five deaths.

3 p.m.Ten Kansas City-area health departments issued a joint public health advisory on COVID-19 Friday, recommending that residents wear face coverings. This is only a recommendation and not a mandate. READ MORE

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12:30 p.m. — The state health department said the Kansas COVID-19 dashboard is experiencing technical difficulties, so updated case numbers are not available yet. The last update from Kansas was on Wednesday when it confirmed 322,264 cases.

11:15 a.m. — Missouri Gov. Mike Parson said the state will “probably” provide funding for a site to help handle the overflow of COVID-19 patients in Springfield, where hospitals are struggling to keep up with a surge-driven by the delta variant and vaccination hesitation.

The Republican governor suggested that federal stimulus money also could help pay for the alternative care site health leaders in the southwestern Missouri city requested. Parson, who was in Springfield on Thursday for an unrelated bill signing, told the Springfield News-Leader that the state will “for the most part probably” fulfill the request.

“We’re in the process of kind of going through that right now to see what we can deliver and what we can’t,” he said. “Those are things we’ve done before, so I think we’ll be able to do (the funding).”

The fast-spreading delta variant has led to a surge in hospitalizations throughout southwestern Missouri. Springfield’s hospitals expect to see patient counts within days that will exceed the previous peak in mid-winter. As of Thursday, 230 people with COVID-19 were hospitalized there. Three weeks ago, the daily average patient count was fewer than 120.

Katie Towns, the interim director of the Springfield-Greene County Health Department, said the alternative care site would provide transitional care for patients stabilized enough to be released from hospitals. She told The Associated Press that options include places such as dorms and hotels. Such makeshift treatment areas were common in Missouri and throughout the country during the winter.

Parson told the News-Leader that some of the cost of setting up the site could be covered by federal stimulus money provided to Springfield and Greene County for pandemic relief.

“There’s a lot of federal funding on the local level, so there may be ways we can partner with the counties and the cities and the hospitals, and they’ll be able to do their part, you know, to come in and help with that,” Parson said.

The governor also told the newspaper that the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention halted the state’s plan to implement an incentive program to encourage vaccinations. Only 45.8% of Missourians have initiated vaccination, which is 10 percentage points below the national average.

“The CDC didn’t accept our plan, which is just totally ridiculous that they would turn us down with Missouri in the situation we’re in right now. So, I think it’s just another obvious problem with the CDC,” Parson said.

A spokeswoman for Parson on Friday didn’t immediately respond to a request for additional details about the Missouri plan and why the CDC denied it. The CDC also didn’t immediately respond to an email seeking comment.

9 a.m. — Doctors with the University of Kansas Health System say cases and hospitalizations continue to rise. As of Friday, there are 32 active cases with 12 patients in the ICU, three on a ventilator and 31 of the active cases were not vaccinated.

“We are in trouble,” Dr. Steve Stites said Friday morning.

8 a.m. — The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services announced the state’s total of confirmed COVID-19 cases reached 541,923 on Friday, which is an increase of 1,734 confirmed cases. The state also reported there have been 100,675 possible antigen cases to date, which is an increase of 603 cases.

The state reported there have been 8,708 positive cases over the last seven days and an average of 1,244 cases a day. This is the third time this week that the state has reported more than 1,400 confirmed new cases with the highest total coming on Thursday with 2,300 reported.

The delta variant of the virus is believed to be responsible for much of the spread in Missouri, especially in the southwestern and northern parts of the state. Officials also cite low vaccination rates, especially in rural areas.

That same variant has been found in Kansas City-area wastewater treatment facilities, meaning it’s beginning to take hold in the metro, and hospitals in the metro are close to capacity.

The state said there have now been 9,470 (+7) deaths since the start of the outbreak.

There are 17% of remaining ICU beds available, 28% hospital beds available and 72% of ventilators available, the state said. The state also reported there were 1,321 hospitalizations associated with COVID, the highest since Feb. 12.

The overall seven-day positivity rate for the state increased to 13.5%, according to the MDHSS. That number is the highest since it was at 14.2% on Jan. 11.

While that number has climbed more than nine percentage points since June, the number is still down from a high of 23.1% in November.

The state said it has administered 5,093,250 vaccine doses, 2,811,562 people have initiated vaccination (or received one dose) and 2,456,311 people have received a second dose. Overall, the state said 45.8% of the population has received at least one dose and 40% have completed vaccination.

An estimated 44% of Kansas City residents have received at least one dose of the vaccine, while Jackson County is at 42.1%, Clay County is at 35.4%, Cass County is at 35.9% and Platte County is at 30.7%.

[ MISSOURI COVID-19 DASHBOARD ]

Missouri does not list how many people have recovered from COVID-19.

Looking at local numbers, the DHSS reported 41,029 confirmed cases in Kansas City, Missouri, and 33,614 cases in Jackson County. The state also lists 8,786 cases in Clay County, 8,201 in Cass County and 3,461 in Platte County.


[ HOW TO GET THE VACCINE, TRACKING NUMBERS IN KANSAS, MISSOURI ]


THURSDAY

5 p.m. — Families in the Hickman Mills and Center school districts are encouraged to set aside some time on Saturday, July 17, to get their children vaccinated and ready to return to school.

The Kansas City Health Department’s vaccine team will be at Smith Hale Middle School, 9010-A Old Santa Fe Road, from 9 a.m. until 2 p.m., providing regular vaccinations to children entering kindergarten and older grades, as well as COVID-19 vaccinations for children 12 years and older.

2 p.m.Missouri’s health department on Thursday reported the highest daily count of new COVID-19 cases since the dead of winter, and the association representing the state’s hospital is warning that the health care system is potentially on the brink of a crisis.

The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services cited 2,302 newly confirmed cases of the virus, the largest one-day count since mid-January, as the delta variant continues to spread in a state with one of the nation’s lowest vaccination rates. Hospitalizations ticked up statewide by 47 to 1,331, as did the number of patients in intensive care units, rising by 19 to 409.

Nearly half of the ICU patients – 196 – are hospitalized in southwestern Missouri. Greene County and Springfield leaders are asking the state to fund an alternative care site since hospitals in Springfield are near capacity.

The Missouri Hospital Association, in its weekly COVID-19 update, called the situation in southwestern Missouri “dire” and said signals for the rest of Missouri are “foreboding.” Statewide, hospitalizations are up 112% from late May lows, though still far below the winter peak of nearly 3,000.

But at least one hospital, Mercy Springfield, was reporting pandemic high numbers of hospitalizations. Erik Frederick, the hospital’s chief administrative officer, wrote on Twitter Thursday that there had been 16 deaths so far this week.

Ashley Kimberling Casad, vice president of clinical services at Cox South Hospital in Springfield, said the hospital was less equipped to handle a surge now. One reason is that it has fewer traveling nurses and is finding it harder to hire them. Also, summer is a busy time for elective surgeries.

The hospital association said hospitalizations in southwestern Missouri could exceed winter highs within days.

“If the rest of the state follows current trajectories – with delta systematically picking off localized pockets of unvaccinated Missourians – our entire health care system will be very near the brink it flirted with during the winter of 2020-2021,” the update stated.

A spokeswoman for Republican Gov. Mike Parson didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment. Parson said last week that hospitals weren’t overwhelmed and that the state was “not in a crisis mode.”

Dr. Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health, told McClatchy Newspapers in an interview published Thursday in the Kansas City Star that Missouri is the most worrisome place in the U.S. right now.

“This is a variant, this delta variant, that’s highly contagious. And so as it starts to spread, anybody who’s not vaccinated is in a danger zone. … The chances of getting infected in Missouri are getting really high and that means potentially serious illness or even death,” Collins said.

12:15 p.m.The Kansas Department of Health and Environment has amended its travel quarantine list to include the countries of the British Virgin Islands, Cyprus, Fiji, Jersey, The United Kingdom and Tunisia. The countries of Brazil, Costa Rica, French Guiana, Maldives, Oman, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Suriname and Uruguay have been removed. These changes are effective today, July 15.

A comprehensive list of those individuals needing to quarantine includes visitors and Kansans who have:

  • Traveled on or after July 15 to British Virgin Islands, Cyprus, Fiji, Jersey, The United Kingdom or Tunisia.
  • Traveled on or after July 1 to Namibia.
  • Traveled on or after June 17 to Kuwait or Mongolia.
  • Traveled on or after June 3 to
  • Traveled on or after May 6 to Seychelles.
  • Traveled on or after April 22 to Argentina.
  • Traveled between July 1 and July 15 to Brazil, Oman or Saint Kitts and Nevis.
  • Traveled between June 3 and July 15 to Suriname.
  • Traveled between May 20 and July 15 to Costa Rica or French Guiana.
  • Traveled between May 6 and July 15 to Maldives.
  • Traveled between April 8 and July 15 to Uruguay.
  • Attendance at any out-of-state mass gatherings of 500 or more where individuals do not socially distance (6 feet) and wear a mask.
  • Been on a cruise ship or river cruise on or after March 15, 2020.

The travel quarantine period is seven days with a negative test result or 10 days without testing, with release from quarantine on Day 8 and Day 11, respectively. Further information on quarantine periods can be found on KDHE’s website.

10:30 a.m. — KMBC 9’s Micheal Mahoney talked to Dr. Francis Collins, the National Institute of Health Director, about the COVID-19 spike in Missouri.

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10 a.m. — The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services announced the state’s total of confirmed COVID-19 cases reached 540,189 on Thursday, which is an increase of 2,302 confirmed cases. The state also reported there have been 100,0072 possible antigen cases to date, which is an increase of 2,009 cases.

That’s the highest increase in confirmed daily cases since Jan. 14.

The state reported there have been 8,375 positive cases over the last seven days and an average of 1,196 cases a day.

The delta variant of the virus is believed responsible for much of the spread in Missouri, especially in the southwestern and northern parts of the state. Officials also cite low vaccination rates, especially in rural areas.

That same variant has been found in Kansas City-area wastewater treatment facilities, meaning it’s beginning to take hold in the metro, and hospitals in the metro are close to capacity.

The state said there have now been 9,463 (+8) deaths since the start of the outbreak.

There are 20% of remaining ICU beds available and 71% of ventilators available, the state said.

The overall seven-day positivity rate for the state increased to 13.1%, according to the MDHSS. That number is the highest since it was at 12.7% on Jan. 13.

While that number has climbed more than nine percentage points since June, the number is still down from a high of 23.1% in November.

The state said it has administered 5,081,003 vaccine doses, 2,803,468 people have initiated vaccination (or received one dose) and 2,451,561 people have received a second dose. Overall, the state said 45.7% of the population has received at least one dose and 39.9% have completed vaccination.

An estimated 44% of Kansas City residents have received at least one dose of the vaccine, while Jackson County is at 42.1%, Clay County is at 35.4%, Cass County is at 35.9% and Platte County is at 30.7%.

[ MISSOURI COVID-19 DASHBOARD ]

Missouri does not list how many people have recovered from COVID-19.

Looking at local numbers, the DHSS reported 40,924 confirmed cases in Kansas City, Missouri, and 33,530 cases in Jackson County. The state also lists 8,773 cases in Clay County, 8,174 in Cass County and 3,457 in Platte County.

9 a.m. — Doctors with the University of Kansas Health System say cases and hospitalizations continue to rise and the situation is “fairly concerning.” As of Thursday, there are 37 active cases with nine patients in the ICU, four on a ventilator and 31 of the active cases were not vaccinated.

8:30 a.m. — Political leaders in St. Louis and St. Louis County have stepped up their efforts to get people vaccinated amid growing concern that the delta variant of COVID-19 ravaging some rural areas of Missouri is making its way to the state’s most populated region.

St. Louis County Executive Sam Page on Wednesday announced the “Sleeves Up STL” initiative, which seeks to enlist beauty salons and barbershops in the northern part of the county to provide vaccine information to customers and encourage them to get inoculated.

Meanwhile, St. Louis’ Board of Aldermen on Tuesday endorsed a plan to offer gift cards as an enticement to get vaccinated.

The fast spread of the delta variant has led to a spike in new cases and hospitalizations in parts of northern and southwestern Missouri. Page said St. Louis County officials have “grave concerns about the impact it could have here.”

He said salons and barbershops are popular gathering places and that he’s hopeful the outreach in northern St. Louis County, where many Black residents live, will lead to more vaccinations. Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show that Black residents are far less likely to get vaccinated than white residents.

In the city of St. Louis, where nearly half of the approximate 300,000 residents are Black, only 40.5% of residents have received at least one vaccine dose. Statewide, 45.5% of residents have received at least an initial shot, which significantly trails the national rate of 55.6%.

St. Louis aldermen backed a plan that would offer prepaid debit cards worth up to $100 to people who get shots. The funding will come from nearly $500 million in federal funding the city will get for pandemic relief.

The plan also would provide one-time $500 payments to 10,000 residents who have been affected by the pandemic. The funding proposal now goes to the Board of Estimate and Apportionment, which is the city’s fiscal body.

Democratic Mayor Tishaura Jones has not said if she will support the aldermanic version of the funding measure.

New cases have been surging in southwestern Missouri. The Springfield-Greene County Health Department on Wednesday asked the state to help fund a COVID-19 alternative care site at a yet-to-be determined site. It said 231 patients were being treated for the virus in hospitals in Greene County, including 104 who were receiving critical care and 61 who were on ventilators. The alternative care site would provide staffing for transitional care for COVID-19 patients.

State health department data shows that 1,284 people were hospitalized with COVID-19 as of Monday. That’s still well below the nearly 3,000 who were hospitalized during the state’s peak period in December, but it’s double the number from mid-May. The 390 people in intensive care units is three times more than in early April.

The state on Wednesday reported 1,460 newly confirmed cases of of COVID-19 and 15 more deaths from the disease, pushing its pandemic totals to 537,887 confirmed cases and 9,455 deaths.

8 a.m. — The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services is having technical difficulties with its COVID-19 dashboard, and the state says it will be back up and running by midday Thursday.


[ HOW TO GET THE VACCINE, TRACKING NUMBERS IN KANSAS, MISSOURI ]


WEDNESDAY
1:30 p.m. — The Kansas Department of Health and Environment reported an increase of 1,155 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in its first update since Monday, pushing the statewide total to 322,264 since the outbreak started.

KDHE reported eight new deaths, making the total since the start of the outbreak 5,196. The state reported hospitalizations increased by 56 to 11,295 since the start of the outbreak.

The state also said it is tracking 103 (+9) cases of the delta variant in Johnson County, 55 (+4) in Wyandotte County, 11 (+1) in Leavenworth County, seven (+1) in Douglas County and three (+1) in Miami County.

State health officials are now also tracking MIS-C cases in the state, or Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in children, associated with COVID-19. So far, the state notes 17 cases.

The overall monthly positivity is at 7.4% for July 2021 to date. However, that number is down from a high of 16.5% in November.

The state also said it has vaccinated 1,310,617 people, 2,383,407 total doses of the vaccine have been administered and 45% of the population has been vaccinated with one dose and 39.6% have completed vaccination.

[ KANSAS COVID-19 COVID-19 DASHBOARD ]

Johnson County is the county with the most confirmed COVID-19 cases since the start of the outbreak with 60,901 cases. Sedgwick County is second with 58,494. Wyandotte County is third with 21,413 cases. Leavenworth County has 7,497 cases, Douglas County reports 9,049 and Miami County has 2,878.

Health officials said they’re now monitoring 51 (+6) outbreak clusters, up from 45 earlier this month. A total of 382 cases have been attributed to these clusters with 18 hospitalizations and five deaths.

9:30 a.m.Local health experts say they’re worried that COVID-19 hotspots are starting to encroach on Kansas City.

Doctors with the University of Kansas Health System say the numbers show not enough people are being vaccinated. and the spread of the delta variant now adds another layer of concern.

“That continues to be infectious, even in areas where we see a higher vaccination rate like Jackson County or Johnson County,” Dr. Steve Stites said. “And then it starts crowding hospitals, which is where I’m, we’re all a little bit nervous because we don’t want to see what’s happening in Springfield happen in Kansas City.”

As pressure on hospitals grows, doctors urge you to get vaccinated– if you haven’t yet – to protect yourself and others from the virus.

KU doctors said they are treating 39 total COVID-19 patients, 29 of which are listed as active. Eight of those patients are in the ICU, two are on a ventilator and 10 are in recovery. Of the active patients, doctors said six were vaccinated.

8 a.m. — The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services announced the state’s total of confirmed COVID-19 cases reached 537,887 on Wednesday, which is an increase of 1,460 confirmed cases. The state also reported there have been 98,063 possible antigen cases to date, which is an increase of 1,429 cases.

The state reported there have been 6,804 positive cases over the last seven days and an average of 972 cases a day.

The delta variant of the virus is believed responsible for much of the spread in Missouri, especially in the southwestern and northern parts of the state. Officials also cite low vaccination rates, especially in rural areas.

That same variant has been found in Kansas City-area wastewater treatment facilities, meaning it’s beginning to take hold in the metro.

The state said there have now been 9,455 (+5) deaths since the start of the outbreak.

There are 21% of remaining ICU beds available and 71% of ventilators available, the state said.

The overall seven-day positivity rate for the state increased slightly to 12.4%, according to the MDHSS. That number is the highest since it was at 12.7% on Jan. 13.

While that number has climbed more than eight percentage points since June, the number is still down from a high of 23.1% in November.

covid-19 cases in missouri

Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services

The state said it has administered 5,067,685 vaccine doses, 2,795,069 people have initiated vaccination (or received one dose) and 2,445,757 people have received a second dose. Overall, the state said 45.4% of the population has received at least one dose and 39.8% have completed vaccination.

An estimated 43.9% of Kansas City residents have received at least one dose of the vaccine, while Jackson County is at 42%, Clay County is at 35.4%, Cass County is at 35.7% and Platte County is at 30.6%.

[ MISSOURI COVID-19 DASHBOARD ]

Missouri does not list how many people have recovered from COVID-19.

Looking at local numbers, the DHSS reported 40,785 confirmed cases in Kansas City, Missouri, and 33,409 cases in Jackson County. The state also lists 8,742 cases in Clay County, 8,133 in Cass County and 3,445 in Platte County.


[ HOW TO GET THE VACCINE, TRACKING NUMBERS IN KANSAS, MISSOURI ]


TUESDAY

5:30 p.m. Rising COVID-19 rates in other states have prompted Chicago to restart a travel order. The Chicago Department of Public Health announced Tuesday that unvaccinated travelers from Missouri and Arkansas have to either quarantine for 10 days or have a negative COVID-19 test. READ MORE

11 a.m. — The city of Springfield, Missouri, announced Monday that it was canceling a major summer festival as COVID-19 surges in the region.

The Birthplace of Route 66 Festival, which was scheduled for Aug. 13-14 and typically includes live music and a classic car parade, has been called off for the second year in a row due to COVID-19. In 2019, the last year the festival was held, it drew 65,000 attendees over two days, and it was expected to host 75,000 this year, according to the city. READ MORE

8 a.m. — The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services announced the state’s total of confirmed COVID-19 cases reached 536,427 on Tuesday, which is an increase of 1,627 confirmed cases. The state also reported there have been 98,063 possible antigen cases to date, which is an increase of 649 cases.

The state reported there have been 6,331 positive cases over the last seven days and an average of 904 cases a day.

Missouri continues leads the nation in the most new COVID-19 cases per capita in the last two weeks.

The delta variant of the virus is believed responsible for much of the spread in Missouri, especially in the southwestern and northern parts of the state. Officials also cite low vaccination rates, especially in rural areas.

covid-19 cases over past seven days

Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services

That same variant has been found in Kansas City-area wastewater treatment facilities, meaning it’s beginning to take hold in the metro.

The state said there have now been 9,440 (+52) deaths since the start of the outbreak. The state reported 47 of the new death reports came from further analysis of death certificates.

There are 19% of remaining ICU beds available and 71% of ventilators available, the state said.

The overall seven-day positivity rate for the state dropped slightly to 12.2%, according to the MDHSS.

While that number has climbed more than eight percentage points since June, the number is still down from a high of 23.1% in November.

The state said it has administered 5,056,125 vaccine doses, 2,787,444 people have initiated vaccination (or received one dose) and 2,441,218 people have received a second dose. Overall, the state said 45.4% of the population has received at least one dose and 39.8% have completed vaccination.

An estimated 43.8% of Kansas City residents have received at least one dose of the vaccine, while Jackson County is at 41.9%, Clay County is at 35.3%, Cass County is at 35.7% and Platte County is at 30.6%.

[ MISSOURI COVID-19 DASHBOARD ]

Missouri does not list how many people have recovered from COVID-19.

Looking at local numbers, the DHSS reported 40,682 confirmed cases in Kansas City, Missouri, and 33,350 cases in Jackson County. The state also lists 8,728 cases in Clay County, 8,108 in Cass County and 3,436 in Platte County.

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[ HOW TO GET THE VACCINE, TRACKING NUMBERS IN KANSAS, MISSOURI ]


MONDAY
3:15 p.m. — Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 vaccine may pose a “small possible risk” of a rare but potentially dangerous neurological reaction, U.S. health officials said Monday.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said in a statement it has received reports of 100 people who got the shot developing Guillain-Barré syndrome, an immune system disorder that can cause muscle weakness and occasionally paralysis. READ MORE

1:30 p.m. — The Kansas Department of Health and Environment reported an increase of 672 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in its first update since last Friday, pushing the statewide total to 321,109 since the outbreak started.

KDHE reported 12 new deaths, making the total since the start of the outbreak 5,188. The state reported hospitalizations increased by 22 to 11,239 since the start of the outbreak.

The state also said it is tracking 94 cases of the delta variant in Johnson County, 51 in Wyandotte County, 10 in Leavenworth County, six in Douglas County and two in Miami County.

State health officials are now also tracking MIS-C cases in the state, or Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in children, associated with COVID-19. So far, the state notes 17 cases.

The overall monthly positivity is at 7.1% for July 2021 to date – which is a spike of 4% from the last update. However, that number is down from a high of 16.5% in November.

The state also said it has vaccinated 1,307,288 people, 2,376,825 total doses of the vaccine have been administered and 44.9% of the population has been vaccinated with one dose and 39.5% have completed vaccination.

[ KANSAS COVID-19 COVID-19 DASHBOARD ]

Johnson County is the county with the most confirmed COVID-19 cases since the start of the outbreak with 60,597 cases. Sedgwick County is second with 58,381. Wyandotte County is third with 21,312 cases. Leavenworth County has 7,442 cases, Douglas County reports 9,040 and Miami County has 2,867.

Health officials said they’re now monitoring 45 outbreak clusters, up from 26 earlier this month. A total of 298 cases have been attributed to these clusters with 21 hospitalizations and seven deaths.

11:30 a.m. — Kansas and Missouri are getting more federal money to fight COVID-19.

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10:30 a.m. — A Springfield, Missouri hospital on Sunday announced it opened its sixth COVID-19 ward as the delta virus variant rages in the state’s southwest region.

That’s the most virus wards Mercy Hospital in Springfield has had. Chief Administrative Officer Erik Frederick tweeted that the hospital needed at most five COVID-19 wards last year.

The hospital was treating 133 virus patients as of Sunday.

“Many local rural communities don’t have high vaccination rates,” Frederick wrote. “They also don’t have a hospital. Get sick, come to Springfield. I think that’s getting left out of the narrative.”

9:15 a.m.As coronavirus case numbers grow, the University of Kansas system is starting to fill up again.

Doctors and nurses are treating 39 patients for COVID-19, and 26 are considered active inpatients, with nine people in the ICU and 10 on ventilators.

Doctors say seven of the 39 patients are vaccinated, and two of them are in the ICU. Doctors say they’re working to get more information on their health histories and backgrounds.

“Remember, out of 39 people, 32 have not been vaccinated,” Dr. Steve Stites said. “But we just want to make sure that we’ve got all the right advice that we can for folks who are being vaccinated and especially if you have other illnesses that accompany that “

Doctors recommend people with underlying health conditions should keep taking safety precautions, even if they’ve been vaccinated.

8 a.m. — The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services announced the state’s total of confirmed COVID-19 cases reached 534,800 on Monday, which is an increase of 154 confirmed cases. The state also reported there have been 98,063 possible antigen cases to date, which is an increase of 17 cases.

The state reported there have been 5,834 positive cases over the last seven days and an average of 833 cases a day.

Missouri continues leads the nation in the most new COVID-19 cases per capita in the last two weeks.

The delta variant of the virus is believed responsible for much of the spread in Missouri, especially in the southwestern and northern parts of the state. Officials also cite low vaccination rates, especially in rural areas.

That same variant has been found in Kansas City-area wastewater treatment facilities, meaning it’s beginning to take hold in the metro.

The state said there have now been 9,388 (+1) deaths since the start of the outbreak. There are 17% of remaining ICU beds available and 71% of ventilators available, the state said.

The overall seven-day positivity rate for the state dropped slightly to 12.3%, according to the MDHSS.

While that number has climbed more than eight percentage points since June, the number is still down from a high of 23.1% in November.

The state said it has administered 5,048,186 vaccine doses, 2,782,295 people have initiated vaccination (or received one dose) and 2,437,868 people have received a second dose. Overall, the state said 45.3% of the population has received at least one dose and 39.7% have completed vaccination.

As of Saturday, an estimated 43.7% of Kansas City residents have received at least one dose of the vaccine, while Jackson County is at 41.8%, Clay County is at 35.2%, Cass County is at 35.6% and Platte County is at 30.5%.

[ MISSOURI COVID-19 DASHBOARD ]

Missouri does not list how many people have recovered from COVID-19.

Looking at local numbers, the DHSS reported 40,594 confirmed cases in Kansas City, Missouri, and 33,245 cases in Jackson County. The state also lists 8,712 cases in Clay County, 8,083 in Cass County and 3,424 in Platte County.


[ HOW TO GET THE VACCINE, TRACKING NUMBERS IN KANSAS, MISSOURI ]


The Associated Press contributed to this story.

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