Grandview School District and Honeywell form unique partnership

Grandview School District and Honeywell form unique partnership
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Inside Don Wheeler’s advanced manufacturing class at Grandview High School, students are learning how to tackle real-world problems.“If that lesson has a purpose it’s going to mean more to them,” said Wheeler.Part of this lesson plan was developed over the summer, as Wheeler and four other Grandview High School teachers took part in a one-of-a-kind externship at Kansas City’s National Security Campus, operated by Honeywell.“We built our own curriculum based off their feedback on what would they want see, what do they want to take away and then what can they bring back to the students here at Grandview to show what is really going on in the real world,” said Eric Wollerman, President of Honeywell FM&T.The teachers spent two weeks inside the secure Honeywell facility in south Kansas City, where workers are responsible for upgrading and maintaining many non-nuclear components of the U.S. nuclear arsenal.“The whole purpose for me was for me to go out there and find out what kind of people do they hire, what kind of skills are they looking for, what qualifications do they want in their workers?” said Wheeler.He’s already started to tailor his lesson plan following the externship, like putting a bigger focus on machining and tooling in the metal shop. It’s all part of the new advanced manufacturing career path for students at Grandview High School.“There’s so many things that are possible, especially with this partnership, that students can literally graduate and get a few credentials and go straight into work and actually have a career that will last them for the rest of their lives,” said Dr. Kenny Rodriguez, Grandview School District superintendent.And for Honeywell, not only does this provide a potential pipeline of workers, but Wollerman believes these kinds of partnerships can make Kansas City stronger.“We know that we’re not going to hire every student that comes out of Grandview,” he said. “But ultimately in the region we’re creating a stronger skillset – a manufacturing skillset, a science mathematics, and engineering skillset – that can be applied to many of the roles in the region.”

Inside Don Wheeler’s advanced manufacturing class at Grandview High School, students are learning how to tackle real-world problems.

“If that lesson has a purpose it’s going to mean more to them,” said Wheeler.

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Part of this lesson plan was developed over the summer, as Wheeler and four other Grandview High School teachers took part in a one-of-a-kind externship at Kansas City’s National Security Campus, operated by Honeywell.

“We built our own curriculum based off their feedback on what would they want see, what do they want to take away and then what can they bring back to the students here at Grandview to show what is really going on in the real world,” said Eric Wollerman, President of Honeywell FM&T.

The teachers spent two weeks inside the secure Honeywell facility in south Kansas City, where workers are responsible for upgrading and maintaining many non-nuclear components of the U.S. nuclear arsenal.

“The whole purpose for me was for me to go out there and find out what kind of people do they hire, what kind of skills are they looking for, what qualifications do they want in their workers?” said Wheeler.

He’s already started to tailor his lesson plan following the externship, like putting a bigger focus on machining and tooling in the metal shop. It’s all part of the new advanced manufacturing career path for students at Grandview High School.

“There’s so many things that are possible, especially with this partnership, that students can literally graduate and get a few credentials and go straight into work and actually have a career that will last them for the rest of their lives,” said Dr. Kenny Rodriguez, Grandview School District superintendent.

And for Honeywell, not only does this provide a potential pipeline of workers, but Wollerman believes these kinds of partnerships can make Kansas City stronger.

“We know that we’re not going to hire every student that comes out of Grandview,” he said. “But ultimately in the region we’re creating a stronger skillset – a manufacturing skillset, a science mathematics, and engineering skillset – that can be applied to many of the roles in the region.”

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